Bowersock Gallery

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Quiescent Light an exhibit of works by Dennis Perrin

Perrin, a southern boy currently residing in Maine, will attend the opening April 12, 6 to 8 p.m. in Mount Dora, FL


Dennis Perrin is a rock star, if one can use the phrase to describe a painter of such refinement and beauty. He has exhibited with us since we opened our first gallery over eight years ago.
Dennis was already a highly sought-after artist. Yet he’s continued to grow, taken his art even further. This current exhibition is unquestionably the most beautiful, and elegant work to date.


Perrin studied with Dell Weller and Auzeklis Ozols at the New Orleans Academy of Fine Art. His work has been collected throughout North America, as well as in Europe and Australia and appears in numerous public collections including the Zigler Museum, The Maier Museum of Art, City National Bank of Louisiana, and The Entergy Corporation, in addition to private collections.
While Perrin’s subjects vary, the skill does not. His works include still life, florals, indoor settings and land and seascapes, each light-drenched, beautiful and tranquil.
In Boston School fashion, (the longest continuing tradition of painting in American art, described as “the legacy of beauty),” Perrin’s work is a mix of evocative elements: texture, values, color vibration, and light and shadow. The settings and hues cling to an era of elegance and ease. The lighting defines the mood, and imbues his images with life and relevance. All conspire to create a sense of time and space.
More than most, Perrin can claim the masterful treatment of light as a signature. “I have chosen to see beauty as revealed by light,” said Perrin. “Each painting that I undertake, regardless of subject, is an attempt to capture an image that is both defined and unified by light.”
In “Intimacy,” part of the “Quiescent Lights” collection, a woman reclines on a pale-rose, late 19th century couch. Sun streams through a multi-paned window touching the model’s turned face. The viewer feels it’s warmth; drawn in, losing themselves to the moment.
In  “Japonica” the female subject is turned away, her face in shadow. Light spills from behind over her back and across the table’s white linen cloth. It bounces off the flow-blue china, lush oranges and pink peonies set in a large, white, china vase, along with other items, all remains of a day’s tea. The window, the light’s source, is reflected in the curved glass of a frame hung above the table. All of it speaks to Perrin’s control of medium, rendering skill and ability as a storyteller.
Perrin offers respite in an insanely plugged-in, fast-paced culture. His graceful figures, sumptuous florals, and calm, moody interiors sooth the eye and soul. This is a contemporary master of the Boston School style; a rare artist of rare beauty.

 

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